40 Damn Pounds

Also I Cuss A Lot

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Silently slinks back into blog…

Well. I’ve had a really crazy year since I was last here. It’s been awesome and busy. I got married to my best friend, we went on a crazy trip across the country to the west coast, and my hotel changed brands. Admittedly, none of it was fitness-based, despite a feeble attempt in the spring to start running again, and the nigh-completion of the 30 day shred over the summer.

I’ve gained weight back. Honestly, I have been afraid to get on the scale. I won’t do it yet because I’m afraid of what’s there. But I took my body measurements and I’m essentially back to square one. Oh lawdy. But I acknowledge it could be worse.

So today I did the fit test for Insane Home Fat Loss. I’m going to be tracking food again starting tomorrow, and I’m going to remind myself that I did, in fact, enjoy being a healthier person at one point. It’s important for me to keep this up over the winter months or it’s just going to get worse. So here we go, here I am Uncle Moe’s, thank you ma’am, let’s get to it.

Filed under personal I'm back

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6 Principles to Body Love

Hey beautiful members! I’ve been mostly absent for a long time but I’m going to try to be more active again, as I want to see this community boom again! I recently wrote up a set of habits that I learned mostly from this community and I want to share them here, so here they are (under LJ-cuts for length):

replace comparison with celebration of variety:

This is about “different than” versus “better than.” I used to have a habit of looking at other people’s bodies to rate myself. If I thought that some aspect of my body was “more attractive” than theirs, I felt vindicated for all of the work I did to maintain a particular look in my body. Instead of seeing them for themselves, as human beings, I saw them as a sample that I could take to see if I was “achieving” “prettiness.” And if I thought that some aspect of my body was “less attractive” than theirs, then I felt panic and despair at not being able to “achieve” that aspect. Most people inspired BOTH reactions.

I overcame this by practicing celebration of variety. If I caught myself comparing, I consciously mentally corrected myself; told myself that there was no “achievement” nor “failure” when it comes to bodies, that beauty is uniqueness and everyone is unique. I practiced this with every body part, from nose to knees to belly to bum, etc. I taught myself to look at other people to appreciate them, and crowded out comparison with appreciation. This leads to the second principle:

replace false images with real ones:

The media are FLOODED with false images; if we were to take our cue from the media, one perceived as “woman/girl” should always be wearing makeup, be white or light-skinned, (usually) be blonde and blue eyed, have a small nose and large eyes and full lips, have body hair shaven, have straight or sleekly coiled hair, have flat bellies, long slim legs, and adolescent-shaped yet heavily large breasts (mainstream media doesn’t like to show many women of color, but there are further restrictive demands if it does show them). That is a VERY specific and VERY unlikely collection of traits. The ‘ideal’ for one perceived as “man/boy” is also restrictive, and there are few to no images of anyone other than “woman/girl/man/boy.” (that lack of images is in itself a false image of invisible/non-existent, also harmful) You can reduce your consumption of these images by not watching TV (especially ads) and not reading magazines; but you will still be forced to see them on billboards and the covers of novels, etc. 

To get rid of the idea that that ‘ideal’ is what beauty is, I reduced my consumption, and I think even more importantly, I surrounded myself with photos that I found beautiful of people of a variety of shapes and sizes and colors (one place to find them is curvygirls). I made those images my computer desktop and my screensaver and I hung them on my walls and I looked for more on an at-least-weekly basis. I also surrounded myself with mirrors. Once I realized that there is a very real “oh that’s weird” reaction when I see anything I’m not used to, I determined to change what I was used to.

Read the entire article here!

Filed under body love curves challenging the media livejournal curvygirls self-esteem inspiration

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Food count for the state fair:
1 bacon corndog
1/2 of a pulled pork sammich
1/2 red velvet funnel cake
2/3 of a chocolate dipped ice cream treat

Totally could have done worse. Hardly anything to fret over, and had an awesome time with Boyfriend and my family.

Food count for the state fair:
1 bacon corndog
1/2 of a pulled pork sammich
1/2 red velvet funnel cake
2/3 of a chocolate dipped ice cream treat

Totally could have done worse. Hardly anything to fret over, and had an awesome time with Boyfriend and my family.